Justice Calling

Last week, Kristen Deede Johnson came to Trinity to speak about her recent book Justice Calling. She came to our BUAD 321 class to relate her research to our study of business.  
With us she discussed how God calls us to justice and ultimately, righteousness; but what does this look like at how do we know the distinction between justice and injustice? To answer that question one must look to scripture.  The Bible is our tool for distinguishing right vs. wrong or justice vs. injustice.  Christians often think that righteousness can be found by pursuing a life in the ministry such as being a pastor, a missionary, or a Christian school teacher.  What Dr. Johnson communicated to us is that it is also acceptable for us not to work directly in these fields. It is acceptable because the different institutions that we will work for can give us the opportunity to pursue justice and to seek shalom. We simply need to shift our attention to the structures and institutions around us because they can allow for individual and community flourishing. If we make the institutions work for everyone, not just ourselves, then everyone can seek justice and shalom together. It will no longer be an individual fight against injustice but, a community putting an end to it.
Overall, this relates greatly to my life because I am about to graduate and enter the workforce full-time. So, it really makes me think about the structures and institutions that I will be entering in the near future. Are there communities that are actively seeking justice? What are the structures that shape us and allow for individual flourishing? Can I enter an institution as a recent graduate and change the way it conducts business or do I need to create my own structure? How can I align myself with God’s calling while working in business? These are questions I have been asking myself since Dr. Johnson’s visit.
I want to follow my dreams of working in the renewable energy industry after college. I think that this is where God is calling me but I can not tell for certain. Right now, I can only go forward with my best intentions and trust that God will guide me to his path.  All along the way I know I need seek the justice and righteousness that God desires.  For me, that would be fighting the injustices of pollution and greenhouse gas emissions through the promotion of renewable energy sources. In whatever I do, I want to promotes justice and individual flourishing.  — Austin VanderVelde

Good Company

Future Founders 2016 U.Pitch Semifinalists

  • Keyante Aytch, 3Dime Designs, DePaul University (IL)
  • Michael Black, ParkingBee, Pennsylvania State University (PA)
  • Linwood Butler, MT Music Transporter, University of Tampa (FL)
  • Claire Coder, AuntFlow, Ohio State University (OH)
  • Vinesh Kannan, Omnipointment, Illinois Institute of Technology (IL)
  • Arjun Kapoor, Scala Computing, Inc., University of Chicago (IL)
  • Tom Kruse, Win-Kel Peer-to-Peer Storage, Indiana University (IN)
  • Jason Lees, GoSpot, Northwood University (MI)
  • Jekolia Matuszewicz, UhTa Ancient Brews, Colorado College (CO)
  • Eddy Mejia, ShoeBoxOne, University of Illinois at Chicago (IL)
  • Dulbadrakh (Daniel) Natsagdorj, Urban Delivery, University of Illinois at Chicago (IL)
  • Gabe Owens, WiNot, Washington University in St. Louis (MO)
  • Matthew Rooda, SwineTech, Inc., University of Iowa (IA)
  • Pranay Singh, Averia Health, University of Chicago (IL)
  • Parisa Soraya, Find Your Ditto, University of Michigan (MI)
  • Riley Tart, MidTrade, Auburn University (AL)
  • Jordan VandeKamp, ApptProvider, Trinity Christian College (IL)
  • Ben Weiss, Zcruit, Northwestern University (IL)

Who Is START Consulting?

START Consulting is a “dream team” of Trinity Christian College students working under the auspices of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Community Empowerment. Some are Bachelor of Science students majoring in Accounting, Entrepreneurial Management, Human Resource Management, Finance, or Marketing who already have project experience because it is part of their major. Others seeking advanced business experience are students majoring in Art, Communication, Computer Science, Digital Design, English, etc. who assist as needed.

All are project-based learners with a passion for learning and serving collaboratively.

Why Do They Do It?

We are called and endowed by God to do good work. Trinity Business faculty and alums empower students to discern, develop, and deploy their gifts and calling to do that work through personal, practical, and professional education. START Consulting provides advanced learning that pushes students even further.

How Do They Do It?

START Consultants are coached by experts: practitioners and scholars. We learn from a healthy, holistic mix of perspectives across disciplines, experience levels, and generations, the kind of mix that results in creative ideas.

What Do They Do?

START Consultants work as a team on projects for for-profit and non-profit organizations. Their work involves collecting primary and secondary research and analysis, developing marketing strategies, and creating implementation plans. They help client firms explore new markets and new product ideas or help them see old ones in new ways. They think outside the box because they don’t see the box. They facilitate innovation.

 

Voice and Touch

(From http://depree.org/max-de-pree/)

In Leadership Jazz Max DePree focuses on the integration of voice and touch.

  • Voice is related to what a leader believes
  • Touch is related to a leader’s competence and resolve

Finding One’s Voice

“[A] leader’s voice is the expression of one’s beliefs….A leader’s touch demonstrates competence and resolve…” (p. 5).

“Leadership can never stop at words.  Leaders must act, and they do so only in the context of their beliefs.  Without action or principles, no on can become a leader” (p. 6).

“Leadership is…not a position but a job.  It’s also a serious meddling in other people’s lives.  One examines leadership beginning not with techniques but rather with premises, not with tools but with beliefs, and not with systems but with understandings” (p. 7).

“A jazz band is an expression of servant leadership.  The leader of the band has the beautiful opportunity to draw the best out of other musicians.  We have much to learn from jazz-band leaders, for jazz, like leadership, combines the unpredictability of the future with the gifts of individuals” (p. 9).

Five criteria for faithfulness in leadership:

  • “Integrity in all things” (p. 10).
  • “The servanthood of leadership” (p. 10).
  • “Accountability for others” (p. 11).
  • The “practice of equity” (p. 11).
  • Vulnerability (p. 12).

A Key Called Promise

“[The] goals of the organization are best met when the goals of people in the organization are met at the same time” (p. 23).

“Any follower has the right to ask many things of her leader….

  • “What may I expect of you?
  • Can I achieve my own goals by following you?
  • Will I reach my potential by working with you?
  • Can I entrust my future to you?
  • Have you bothered to prepare yourself for leadership?
  • Are you ready to be ruthlessly honest?
  • Do you have the self-confidence and trust to let me do my job?
  • What do you believe?” (p. 24).

What’s Fragile?

“From a leader’s perspective, the most serious betrayal has to do with thwarting human potential, with the quenching of the spirit, with failing to deal equitably with each other as human beings” (p. 34).

“Leaders must speak to followers; we must let them know where and how we stand on important issues.  We constantly make decisions and evaluate results in light of what we believe” (p. 36).

“Vulnerability in a leader enables others to do their best and to be fully accountable.  And, of course, being vulnerable to the strengths of other people also makes the leader vulnerable to their weaknesses” (p. 41).

“Preparation for leadership does not come from books. Books sometimes give you an insight or an outline, but real preparation consists of hard work and wandering in the desert, much feedback, much forgiveness, and the yeast of failure” (pp. 42, 43).

“Everybody battles for success; too few people are aware of its profound impact.  Success tends to breed arrogance, complacency, and isolation.  Success can close the mind faster than prejudice.  Success if fragile, like a butterfly.  We usually crush the life out of it in our efforts to possess it” (p. 47).

God’s Mix

“[The] mystery around potential is so great that even the most perceptive of us cannot look at a person and decide for certain whether or not she’ll be good at this or that, whether or not she’ll become a sales manager or vice president — or even the best shortstop you ever saw.  We really should be in awe of human potential” (p. 53).

“We are dealing with God’s mix, people made in God’s image, a compelling mystery” (p. 57).

Watercarriers

“I like to think of management in two broad categories, scientific and tribal.  The tribal is certainly the most important and, while palpable is quite difficult to grasp and nurture….Tribal means shared goals but different and separate responsibilities….You can’t be hired into a tribe.  Joining a tribe results in a certain intimacy.  This intimacy links the talents and skills that each of us brings to the job and the corporation on behalf of our customers–with marvelously delightful and worthwhile results” (pp. 70, 71).

Leaders’ Leaders

“I happen to believe that a large part of the secret [to renewal and innovation and vitality] lies in how individual leaders in a great variety of settings make room for people with creative gifts and temporarily become followers themselves” (p. 94).

“How does a leader approach the process of creative work?

  • A leader protects unusual persons from the bureaucracy and legalism so ensconced in our organizations.  A leader remains vulnerable to real surprise and to true quality….
  • A leader works with creative people without fear…” (pp. 96, 97).

“A writer, when asked why he wrote, replied, ‘Because I have to, not because I want to'” (p. 102).

Take Five

“The lore of life, the way to one’s voice, comes more from mistakes than achievements, more from listening than talking, more from these teachers and enablers than from one’s own understanding” (pp. 111, 112).

“Have you taken five to ponder the nature of the contribution that other people make to your leadership?  I highly recommend it” (p. 114).

Give the Gift of Change

“Some gifts to ponder:

  • Space–to be the kind of person I can be.
  • Opportunity–to serve.
  • Challenge–constraints are enabling friends.
  • Clarity–in objectives, in evaluation, and in feedback.
  • Authenticity–that gives hierarchy its true value, that gives me the right to offer my gifts, that neither overlooks nor oppresses.
  • Meaning–a lasting foundation of hope.
  • Accountability–a result of love.
  • Conscience–that forbids people to enjoy apathy or debilitating ease…”

and “an ethos for change” (p. 141).

Delegate!

“A good leader says, “I love you enough to make you accountable.  You have the right to be part of this task” (p. 155).

“As I see it, delegation requires a form of dying, a separation of issue from self.  We must surrender or abandon ourselves to the gifts that other people bring to the game.  We must become vulnerable to every person’s need to do her best….This means to me that we must go beyond learning a single skill or specific knowledge to acquiring the art and grace of a job” (pp. 157, 158).

“As someone once said, in delegating, leaders give roots and they give wings” (p. 160).

Polishing Gifts

“Polishing gifts is different than career development” (p. 169).

Amateurs

“To be an amateur means literally that you do something for the love of it” (p. 188)”.

“Amateurs simply don’t know what they can’t do” (p. 193).

Followership

“I’ve often asked myself, ‘Are the poorest sandlot baseball players chosen last because they commit so many errors?  Or do they commit errors because they’re chosen last?” (p. 198).

Consulting Student Consultants

Many college students work in teams. Many engage in project-based learning. Some apply and test their knowledge, skills, and values by engaging in consulting projects, working on problems/questions given them by businesses and non-profit organizations.

Many times the students are advised by a faculty member, only ONE faculty member, their professor. But professors, even if they have Ph.Ds and years of work experience, have limited knowledge and wisdom. Their perspectives and perceptions are based on and biased by their own unique experiences. Think of the fable of the blind men and the elephant. Each of us is “blinded” by our own point of view. Thus the quality of students’ consulting work is limited by the professor’s and the students’ particular experiences (or lack thereof).

So bring in more “blind” people!

Here’s how wise practitioners add value (help us see the “elephants”):

  • Give insight into the client’s problem/opportunity
  • Give insight on the internal workings of the student team
  • Give insight on the consulting process
  • Give insight on the academic program
  • Give insight on what is holding us back!

Engaging alumni and friends in the education process is part of our not-so-secret sauce.

Asking them to advise (consult) our student consultants on intra-curricular and extra-curricular projects is just one way to do that.

And the best advisers do that simply by providing analogies and asking insightful questions.

What Makes Trinity Business Different?

We are created, called, and endowed by God to do good work. Trinity Business empowers students to discern, develop, and deploy their gifts and calling to do that work through personal, practical, and professional learning experiences.

  • PERSONAL: we offer individual students the attention and opportunities they need to flourish—we are a small college community networked into the immense City of Chicago.
  • PRACTICAL: we offer students the ability to apply their talents and knowledge through our project-based course-work (e.g., students who are coached by consultants to consult with clients) , Chicago Semester, and our Center for Entrepreneurship and Community Empowerment, which sponsors “speed interviewing,” a community health initiative focused on interdisciplinary research and education, a student consulting team (START Consulting), and student entrepreneurs (START Entrepreneurs).
  • PROFESSIONAL: we offer students specialized Bachelor of Science degrees in Accounting, Entrepreneurial Management, Human Resource Management, Finance, and Marketing. The result is that students develop Universal Student Business Qualities* and the particular skills of strategic analysis and innovation in those distinct but related business fields.

And in return students inspire us with their innovative spirit. For example, recently two of our students, Jordan VandeKamp and Craig VanderGalien, were named semi-finalists at Chicago-based Future Founders’ UPitch2016 competition along with teams from the Big Ten and other Division 1 schools. They were the crowd favorite, winning the Venture Award.

Trinity Business is a great system to be part of!

__________________________

 

*Universal Student Business Qualities

  • Resourceful
  • Effective in Teams
  • Critical in Thinking
  • Faithful in Living
  • Innovative and Creative
  • Ethical
  • Professional
  • Technically Competent

 

 

 

 

Speed Interviewing

 

Speed Interviewing is a accessible and effective venue for students to learn from alums.

The event works like this: instructors of introduction to business courses form student teams around common career aspirations and alums in those careers are invited and assigned to be interviewed by student teams.  In under an hour student teams interview alums in 15-minute intervals for a total of three rounds.

Why do instructors do it?  To help introduce students to business disciplines (accounting, entrepreneurial management, finance, marketing, etc) and organizational culture from the perspective of people who practice those disciplines as a career and even calling.  Why do instructors do that?  Ultimately to empower students to better understand themselves and organizational culture so that they can better envision what life after college looks like so they can make more informed decisions about their academic program and career expectations.

But Speed Interviewing is only the beginning of our learning.

Here are examples of the questions students ask:

  • What type of work do you do?
  • What skills are especially needed to do your work well?
  • What did you major in at Trinity?  How did that help you with the work you do?
  • How would you describe your career path?
  • How would you characterize your leadership style?
  • How would you characterize the culture of your organization?
  • What advice do you have for current students?

 

What Happens at e-boost?*

Visit a destination (incubator**);

get ready to launch

 

Encircle early stage start-ups***:

  • vision
  • milestones
  • constraints: what’s holding you back?
  • strategy
  • executable plan

Share ideas and ask for feedback

 

Learn from and laugh with others

 

Share life lessons

  • Success = pivots
  • Success = focus away from self

 

See old friends and make new ones!

 

*Thanks to Hope College and Trinity Christian College students and alums for attending!

**Thanks to Omar Sweiss (1871) and Ethan Adams (Future Founders) for the tour!

***Thanks to Mackenzi Huyser and Kendra Wright of Chicago Semester for hosting e-boost Chicago!

e-boost Chicago, Oct 7-8!

 

 

 

Announcing e-boost Chicago!

The purpose of e-boost Chicago is to strengthen, build, and harness the power of our e-tribe to give our student entrepreneurs a boost.

What’s in it for student entrepreneurs? An opportunity to be inspired and consulted by experienced entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial students, and a chance to grow their network of advisory relationships.

What’s in it for entrepreneurial students? An opportunity to experience a taste of entrepreneurship.

What’s in it for Trinity alums and friends of CECE? An opportunity to make a difference — to help empower the next generation of entrepreneurial leaders and leading entrepreneurs!

Session Schedule (Choose to Attend Some or All Activities)

  • 11:00 AM –  Stop at 1871 and Future Founders (222 W. Merchandise Mart Plaza, Suite 1212, Chicago, IL 60654) for a quick pre-e-boost Chicago event tour!
  • 12:30 PM — Meet at Chicago Semester (11 E Adams St # 1200, Chicago, IL 60603) for a quick lunch.

 

  • 1:00 PM — Welcome
  • 1:15 PM — e-circles: Student entrepreneurs pitch their startups, foreverUIKG, and Glacier Peak, to participants. Participants then form teams around student startups to: Assess the Situation, Brainstorm Goals and Strategies to Achieve Next Phase/Step (Boost!); Develop Implementation Plans (ASI);  What is Strategy?  Vision (where do you wish to be in 3-5 years), Milestones, Constraints (What’ holding you back?), Strategy (How will we overcome those constraints?), Execution Plan

 

  • 2:30 PM — Break (snacks)
  • 2:45 PM — Share Plan Highlights and Debrief
  • 3:00 PM — e-(Open) Mic — share your idea and ask questions of the audience
  • 4:15 PM — Break (snacks)
  • 4:30 PM — e-panel: Matt Gira, Co-Founder, Fathom Underwater Drone; Ryan Hesslau, foreverU; Scott Brandonisio, Co-Founder,  RingCam.

 

  • 5:30 PM – Break (light dinner)
  • 6:00 PM — e-speaker: Craig Steensma, Founder of Eshots (6:45 PM — Q&A)

 

 

 

Register by Wednesday, Oct 5, at https://www.facebook.com/events/320958918254856/. Thank you!

 

Tony Dykstra Named CECE’s First START Scholar Consultant

 

The Center for Entrepreneurship and Community Empowerment is pleased to announce that Tony Dykstra has been named its first START Scholar Consultant.   As the first START Scholar Consultant Tony will be employed to:

  • Create an interdisciplinary team of talented Trinity Christian College students
  • Partner with experienced practitioners
  • Develop client relationships
  • Lead a team of student strategy-oriented consultants
  • Serve for-profit and non-profit organizations

In addition Tony will assist CECE’s director by helping to recruit prospective students and representing CECE at various events.

The Troll Scholars Consultant appointment is for the Fall 2016 semester.   To qualify, candidates must be Trinity students with a successful track record in leadership and consulting, and the heart to make a positive difference guided by Christian values.

Tony is a Junior Entrepreneurial Management and Marketing double major and a member of men’s golf team.  He is co-founder of Trinity’s E-Club (Entrepreneurship Club) and serves as its president.  This summer he worked as in intern in San Diego, CA.  Last year, as E-Club president, he played a significant role in Trinity’s dodgeball tournament which raised money for the Empowerment Fund.  Proceeds were used to purchase a standing wheelchair for Katie Vree, a junior nursing major.